Kitchen Ventilation Cooking Equipment

Why is cooking equipment makes and models important for preliminary engineering?

Outdated methods of ventilation design categorized appliances into different classes of light, medium, heavy duty and extra heavy duty (solid fuel). Average exhaust rates were established for each category based on rules of thumb, cfm per foot of hood. With the advent of U.L. 710 test, this morphed into minimum exhaust per surface temperature (400° […]

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SupplyAir

What temperature should the supply air be introduced to the Kitchen?

Engineers will typically design for a supply air temperature at 10 degrees above traditional occupied spaces outside of the kitchen. Supply air is usually brought into an occupied space at 57°F/14°C off the coil to mix with room air to maintain a specified space temperature at design conditions. In a kitchen, due to the air […]

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AHJ_766x511

Who is the “AHJ” and what authority do they have on a project?

AHJ refers to “The Authority Having Jurisdiction”. The AHJ has final authority for the interpretation of fire and building codes (NFPA, IMC). Although model codes are interepted fairly consistently, a number of municipalities may have variations or interpret certain elements of the codes differently. In some cases there are additions not covered in the model […]

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Heat Gain to Space

How heat sources differ in commercial kitchens than other commercial spaces

Mechanical engineers calculate cooling and heating loads for commercial spaces in order to size the ventilation systems. The type of space plays a key role in determining necessary ventilation requirements. Commercial kitchens are unique in they operate year round and cooling is almost always required, even during the colder winter months. This is due to […]

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